Review: 99 Percent Mine

99 Percent Mine by Sally Thorne

Publication Date: 1/29/19
Publisher: William Morrow
Rating: 2/5

Disclaimer: I received a free copy of this book from William Morrow (Harper Collins) in exchange for my honest opinion. This has no effect on my opinion, review, or rating.

Review: Sally Thorne’s newest romcom, 99 Percent Mine, follows childhood friends, Darcy and Tom, who haven’t seen each other in a while. Darcy inherits her late grandmother’s house along with her twin brother, Jamie, and they hire Tom to do the renovations to sell. Problem is that Jamie has claimed Tom 100% his as his BFF, but Darcy has a huge crush on Tom who is engaged to a different girl. As I was reading,I found myself comparing this book to The Hating Game. It’s absolutely nothing like Sally’s last book which a bit disappointing to me. Darcy isn’t the typical female main character which is awesome and refreshing, but I didn’t like how pathetic she came off as throughout the book. Darcy was always pining after Tom which was so cringeworthy and her heart condition didn’t really help with the story. In terms of the writing style, I did like the romantic parts of the novel which were fun to read and loved the epilogues. But I noticed that some of the writing seemed to be a bit choppy and didn’t flow as well as Sally’s previous book which I found to be surprising. Also I usually don’t critique book covers, but I felt that the happy, cheery, yellow cover was completely off point. It doesn’t really reflect the storyline or Darcy and Tom’s romance at all. My recommendation is that if you loved The Hating Game and decide to pick up 99 Percent Mine, go in knowing that it will be completely different style from The Hating Game.

Review: Chemistry

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Chemistry by Weike Wang

Clues to describe this book: Toxic Stress, Fork in the road, Self Identity, Acceptance

Review: Chemistry is a coming-of-age story about a young Chinese-American female scientist who goes on a soul-searching journey to find herself as she wrestles with the burden of parental expectations, career aspirations, and her boyfriend’s marriage proposal. Weike’s writing style is choppy and is told from the perspective an unnamed protagonist. Overall, I enjoyed this book and felt that this book was very relatable, especially the part about needing to live up to the expectations that comes with being second generation Asian. Chemistry is a short, but it’s well-written and a satisfying read. If you ever felt like you have encountered a fork in the road, this book will resonate with you and is definitely worth the read.