How I Rate Books

Rating books is subjective. There isn’t really a right or wrong way, but there are some topics to consider when rating a book. Here are some of the questions I ask myself to help me determine my rating:

  • Did the plot match the summary or teaser?
  • Did this book resonate me?
  • What did I think of the characters?
  • What were my favorite parts of the novel?
  • What were my least favorite parts? Why?
  • Was the book overall entertaining?

As for the actual rating, I usually base my rating from the standard 1 to 5 stars. I don’t do half star reviews as you can’t leave half star reviews on GoodReads or Amazon. Personally, I don’t find them to be very helpful either.

Down below is my rating scale I go by.

Do you agree with how I rate books? How do you rate books your read? Share in the comments below!

Review: Xeni: A Marriage of Inconvenience

Xeni: A Marriage of Inconvenience by Rebekah Weatherspoon

Publication Date: 10/4/19

Disclaimer: I received a free advanced copy this book from the author in exchange for my honest opinion. This has no effect on my opinion, review, or rating.

GoodReads Synopsis: Xeni Everly-Wilkins has ten days to clean out her recently departed aunt’s massive colonial in Upstate New York. With the feud between her mom and her sisters still raging even in death, she knows this will be no easy task, but when the will is read Xeni quickly discovers the decades old drama between the former R&B singers is just the tip of the iceberg. The Secrets, lies, and a crap ton of cash spilled on her lawyer’s conference room table all come with terms and conditions. Xeni must marry before she can claim the estate that will set her up for life and her aunt has just the groom in mind. The ruggedly handsome and deliciously thicc Scotsman who showed up at her aunt’s memorial, bagpipes at the ready.
When his dear friend and mentor Sable Everly passed away, Mason McInroy knew she would leave a sizable hole in his heart. He never imagined she’d leave him more than enough money to settle the debt that’s keeping him from returning home to Scotland. He also never imagined that Sable would use her dying breaths to play match-maker, trapping Mason and her beautiful niece in a marriage scheme that comes with more complications than either of them need.
With no choice but to say I do, the unlikely pair try to make the best of a messy situation. They had no plans to actually fall in love.

Review: Xeni is the second installment of the Loose Ends series and can also be read as a stand-alone novel. This has been the second book I’ve read from Rebekah Weatherspoon and it did not disappoint! Rebekah had a note about trigger warnings about specific sensitive topics which I immensely appreciated so I was able to prepare myself emotionally for the upcoming sensitive topics. I loved the diverse set of characters in this story. The characters also felt people that you would meet in real life which gave them more depth. Rebekah’s writing style keeps the reader engaged through out the story. It was also refreshing to see how mature the characters were and that they owned up to their own mistakes. If you love really steamy romance reads, I’d recommend picking this book up. Note that this book may not be everyone’s cup of tea though.

Rating: 4/5

Review: The Chestnut Man

The Chestnut Man by Søren Sveistrup

Publication: Harper Collins

Publication Date: 9/3/19

Disclaimer: I received a free finished copy of this book from Harper Collins in exchange for my honest opinion. This has no effect on my opinion, review, or rating.

GoodReads Synopsis:The heart-pounding debut from the creator of the hit Scandinavian television show The Killing.

If you find one, he’s already found you.

A psychopath is terrorizing Copenhagen.

His calling card is a “chestnut man”—a handmade doll made of matchsticks and two chestnuts—which he leaves at each bloody crime scene.

Examining the dolls, forensics makes a shocking discovery—a fingerprint belonging to a young girl, a government minister’s daughter who had been kidnapped and murdered a year ago.

A tragic coincidence—or something more twisted?

To save innocent lives, a pair of detectives must put aside their differences to piece together the Chestnut Man’s gruesome clues.

Because it’s clear that the madman is on a mission that is far from over.

And no one is safe. 

Review: The premise of the book is quite intriguing and captures your attention from page 1. I found the multiple characters at the beginning to be quite confusing, but at the end it all makes sense. I wasn’t a huge fan of the writing style as I felt like it jumped around a bit. I found that I needed to be in a certain mood to read this book and really pay attention to every little detail. The storyline was definitely unique and resonated with me well after I finished the book. If you like crime books with gore, I’d recommend picking this one up.

Rating: 4/5

Review: Imaginary Friend

Imaginary Friend by Stephen Chbosky

Publication: Grand Central Publishing

Publication Date: 10/1/19

Disclaimer: I received a free advanced digital copy of this book from Grand Central Publishing in exchange for my honest opinion. This has no effect on my opinion, review, or rating.

NetGalley Synopsis: Christopher is seven years old. Christopher is the new kid in town. Christopher has an imaginary friend. 

We can swallow our fear or let our fear swallow us. Single mother Kate Reese is on the run. Determined to improve life for her and her son, Christopher, she flees an abusive relationship in the middle of the night with her child. Together, they find themselves drawn to the tight-knit community of Mill Grove, Pennsylvania. It’s as far off the beaten track as they can get. Just one highway in, one highway out.

At first, it seems like the perfect place to finally settle down. Then Christopher vanishes. For six awful days, no one can find him. Until Christopher emerges from the woods at the edge of town, unharmed but not unchanged. He returns with a voice in his head only he can hear, with a mission only he can complete: Build a tree house in the woods by Christmas, or his mother and everyone in the town will never be the same again.

Review: Imaginary Friend is Stephen Chbosky’s long awaited second novel. If his name sound familiar to you, it’s because he wrote The Perks of Being a Wallflower. Imaginary Friend was definitely a book that was out of my typical reading genre, but I’m glad that I gave it a chance. This horror book gave me Stranger Things vibes all the way and I loved how unique and intriguing the storyline was. I was immediately captured with the story and its characters from page 1. However, there were some instances in the story that lowered my overall rating of the book. First and foremost, the book felt like it was way too long (over 700 pages) and I thought it could have been culled down to under 500 or so. I wasn’t a big fan of religion talk or the descriptions of the dark fantasy in the book. There were also too many characters to keep track of and I lost interest in a few of the characters towards 60% of the book. Overall, if you like thriller or horror books, I would recommend picking this one up. 

Rating: 3/5

Love or Hate Audiobooks?

Do you listen to audiobooks? I started listening to audiobooks a couple of years ago (back in 2017). At first, I had mixed feelings about them, but now, I like them! I still prefer reading physical books and ebooks over listening to audiobooks, but nowadays, I do like to look into audiobooks as an option too.

If you’re on the fence about listening to audiobooks, here are some pros and cons to help you decide if they’re right for you to try out!

Do you like audiobooks? Why or why not?

Review: No Judgements

No Judgements by Meg Cabot

Publication: William Morrow Paperbacks

Publication Date: 9/24/19

Disclaimer: I received a free advanced digital copy of this book from William Morrow Paperbacks in exchange for my honest opinion. This has no effect on my opinion, review, or rating.

NetGalley Synopsis: The storm of the century is about to hit Little Bridge Island, Florida—and it’s sending waves crashing through Sabrina “Bree” Beckham’s love life…

When a massive hurricane severs all power and cell service to Little Bridge Island—as well as its connection to the mainland—twenty-five-year-old Bree Beckham isn’t worried . . . at first. She’s already escaped one storm—her emotionally abusive ex—so a hurricane seems like it will be a piece of cake.

But animal-loving Bree does become alarmed when she realizes how many islanders have been cut off from their beloved pets. Now it’s up to her to save as many of Little Bridge’s cats and dogs as she can . . . but to do so, she’s going to need help—help she has no choice but to accept from her boss’s sexy nephew, Drew Hartwell, the Mermaid Café’s most notorious heartbreaker.

But when Bree starts falling for Drew, just as Little Bridge’s power is restored and her penitent ex shows up, she has to ask herself if her island fling was only a result of the stormy weather, or if it could last during clear skies too.

Review: Meg Cabot has been one of my all-time favorite authors since The Princess Diaries came out. No Judgements, kicks off with her newest series Little Bridge Island series. Note there is a short story not in this book called Bridal Boot Camp, which is a bit of a prequel to this book, but it isn’t necessary in reading it though. Back to No Judgements, I found this be a decent read overall. I love how Meg Cabot’s writing keeps you interested and liked the set of characters she presented. However, I did find the story start out a bit too slow for me and it picks up out of nowhere in the last half of the book. I also noticed that towards the end of the book, the storyline is a bit all over place and it seemed a bit crammed. I understand that the author was trying to incorporate some important themes in this book and I appreciate her for trying to do that, but I feel that it wasn’t executed as well as it could been. Regardless if you’re a fan of Meg Cabot’s, you’ll definitely won’t want to miss this one.

Rating: 3/5